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Wanted: Data Feeds

March 11th, 2008 by Erick Beck

One of the additions that I want to make to the A&M web presence is to really boost the amount of content that we syndicate via XML feeds. Similar to our news RSS feeds and our previous request for calendar and podcast feeds, I’d like get begin building a library of page content – XML elments that other webmasters can take and add into their own sites (and which we can take from them if we can get a critical mass going.) This sort of exchange will of course be made easier once we’re all playing nicely inside the Content Management System, but since that day is probably still a long ways off I offer this as a bridge.

What kind of information are we looking for? A bit of everything. I have already created one for academic colleges, the president’s executive staff, and our Google GSA search report as examples to show that just about anything can be syndicated. Any page that is a long list of information is tailor made for turning into a feed. I’ve even contemplated going through all of our FAQ pages and syndicating those in XML.

So use your imagination. If you have content on your page it’s a sure bet that someone else on campus would love to use it as well. Let’s start getting our content into a format that can be syndicated so that we all have access to a common source of material rather than having to reinvent the wheel, or the Academic Calendar as the case may be…

Tuesday, March 11th, 2008 Miscellaneous, www.tamu.edu
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2 Comments to Wanted: Data Feeds

  1. Can ya’ll please refrain from using http://www/ links, not everyone on campus, and likely no one off campus, has their default search domain set to tamu.edu.

  2. Rob Ostensen on March 20th, 2008
  3. You’re right, my apologies. The fingers are sometimes quicker than the brain. I’ve got this particular poste updated in any case…

  4. Erick on March 20th, 2008

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